The Tobacco Free Alliance of Virginia is a broad partnership of private, not for profit and public leaders and organizations united in their focus on pricing of tobacco products, creating smoke-free environments, and funding tobacco prevention and cessation. The Alliance is based on the successful efforts of Virginians for Healthy Future and its Smoke Free Virginia Now campaign in 2008 which resulted in modest increases in tobacco taxes and smoke free restaurant and bar laws. Several partners (American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, Virginia Department of Health, and Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth) have revived our statewide tobacco free efforts.

The Tobacco Free Alliance of Virginia is represented by Virginia residents, businesses, academic institutions, health care providers, community-based organizations, non-profit groups, advocates, and people of faith. The alliance seeks to engage innovative and dynamic organizations and individuals in the most transformational movement to improve health in the history of our state.

Our Mission

The Tobacco Free Alliance of Virginia is dedicated to changing policies, systems and environments to promote a tobacco free, healthy Virginia.

Our Vision

A Commonwealth where all residents live a tobacco-free, healthy lives.

Overarching Goals

  • Engage in proactive advocacy for policies, systems and environmental change to eliminate tobacco use;
  • Educate policy makers and the public about strategies to create tobacco free communities;
  • Promote coordination and collaboration of efforts by tobacco prevention advocates;
  • Use evidence-based approaches to assure sustainable, replicable change statewide.

Dates for 2014 Meetings

  • Thursday, March 13
  • Thursday, May 15
  • Thursday, September 25

Time for all meetings: 10am-3pm

Location for all meetings:
Virginia Community Healthcare Association
3831 Westerre Parkway
Henrico, VA 23233


Membership Committee

Information Coming Soon.

Communication Committee

Pam MacIntyre,M.Ed.,M.S.G.

Faculty/Project Manager
University of Virginia,Office of CME
Charlottesville, VA 22908-0711 

(434) 982-4136
pam2n@virginia.edu

Amy Paulson, MPH, AE-C
CINCH Director/Instructor
Division of Community Health and Research
Department of Pediatrics, Eastern Virginia Medical School
EV Williams Hall
855 West Brambleton Avenue
Norfolk, VA 23510
(757) 668-6458
PaulsoAC@evms.edu

Kathryn Whitestone,
CHES
Health Educator
(434) 972-6244
1138 Rose Hill Drive
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(434) 972-6244
Julia.Wonch@vdh.virginia.gov


Articles


NEW RESOURCES FOR FOR MAINTAINING SMOKEFREE WORKPLACES, HOUSING, AND COLLEGE CAMPUSES
Although some laws concerning where and when tobacco products can be used are clear-cut, others are more nuanced and can be confusing. To help demystify these laws, ChangeLab Solutions' three newest resources explain strategies for preserving smokefree environments and enforcing smokefree policies in workplaces, rental properties, and college campuses. Access the resources.

VIRGINIA-BASED RETAIL GROUP URGES YOUTH E-CIG BAN
A trade group is encouraging convenience stores and gas stations not to sell electronic cigarettes to minors, according to a position statement obtained by The Associated Press. The National Association of Convenience Stores' new position states that, as a best practice, e-cigarettes should be treated just like other age-restricted tobacco products. The move was communicated to its members on Thursday. Read the article.

REPORT: E-CIGARETTE POISONING ON THE RISE
A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds e-cigarette liquids are behind an alarming increase in the number of phone calls made to U.S. poison control centers. View the article here.

SIMON CHAPMAN: WHY IS BIG TOBACCO INVESTING IN E-CIGARETTES
Discussion about e-cigarettes on social media, the blogosphere, and vaping chatrooms is dominated by impassioned accounts from former, now vaping, smokers wanting to encourage smokers to do what they have done. Join the discussion.

SIMON CHAPMAN ON E-CIGARETTES: THE BEST AND WORST CASE SCENARIOS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH
Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs or Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems—ENDS) is showing exponential increase in some nations. Join the discussion.

STATEMENT FROM JOHN R. SEFFRIN, PH.D., CEO OF THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
The American Cancer Society congratulates CVS Caremark on its decision to stop the sale of tobacco products in all of its stores. This move is an important new development in the fight to save lives from the devastating effects of tobacco use. Read the full statement here.

CVS VOWS TO QUIT SELLING TOBACCO PRODUCTS
CVS Caremark, the country’s largest drugstore chain in overall sales, announced on Wednesday that it planned to stop selling cigarettes and other tobacco products by October. View the article here.

RISE OF E-CIGARETTES AND ANCILLARY BUSINESSES
2013 might be remembered as the year when electronic cigarettes took off in the heart of tobacco country. At least eight retail stores specializing in selling electronic cigarettes, battery-powered devices or e-cigarettes, opened this year in the Richmond area. View the article here.

ADULTS WORRY E-CIGARRETTES WILL ENCOURAGE KIDS TO START SMOKING TOBACCO
Adults nationwide are concerned about the use of e-cigarettes by children and teens, with 44 percent indicating worries that the devices will encourage kids to use tobacco products, according to a new poll from the University of Michigan. View the poll here.

STATE LAWMAKER PUSHING TO BAN E-CIGARETTES TO MINORS

Delegate David Ramadan has introduced a bill to make it illegal for minors to purchase e-cigs, saying he got the idea from parents that approached him.  "Under 18 children were able to buy these cigarette looking product in malls and they have seen a trend in children starting to use it." As for the harmful effects of e-cigs on minors, Dr. David Arkin says the effects could be serious.  "Once again, young children have the potential to become addicted to nicotine for the next 50, 60 years of their life," he says. "It can affect your heart, if you read the warning labels on nicotine patches, it will give you all the side effects of nicotine and they're substantial."  While it is a better alternative to cigarettes, there's no health benefits for kids who start to smoke.  Arkin says there is still a lot not known about e-cigarettes and that after more research, more problems could potentially be discovered. View the article here.

MMWR: HEALTH-CARE PROVIDER SCREENING FOR TOBACO SMOKING AND ADVICE TO QUIT - 17 COUNTRIES, 2008-2011
This report indicates a wide variation across 17 countries in the percentage of smokers (aged >15 years) who visited a health-care provider.  Report of health care provider screening for tobacco smoking was highest in Romania (82.1%), Uruguay (76.6%), and Egypt (74.1%); report of asking and advising to quit in the past year was highest in Romania (67.3%), Egypt (67.0%) and Brazil (57.1%).  Among smokers in five of the seventeen countries, men were significantly more likely than women to report that a health-care provider asked about smoking and advised them to quit, with adjusted odds ratios ranging from 1.6 to 8.5. In fourteen of the seventeen countries, older (45-64 years of age) versus younger smokers (<24 years of age) were significantly more likely to report that a health-care provider asked and advised them to quit, with adjusted odds ratios ranging from 1.8 to 6.7.  Health-care providers should consistently and routinely screen for tobacco use among all patients and for those who use tobacco, offer advice and assistance in quitting.  Effective community-based strategies that increase cessation among tobacco users are encouraged globally, especially in settings where access to health-care providers is limited. Countries can also create supportive environments that encourage and increase cessation by increasing the price of tobacco products, implementing smoke-free policies, mass media campaigns, and quitlines, and promoting health systems changes to increase clinical interventions. View more of the report here.

MMWR: CDC HEALTH DISPARITIES AND INEQUALITIES REPORT --- UNITED STATES
This supplement is the second in a series of reports that address health disparities. The 2011 CHDIR was the first CDC report to assess health disparities across a wide range of diseases, behavioral risk factors, environmental exposures, social determinants, and health-care access (8). The 2013 CHDIR includes more current data for 19 of the topics published in 2011. Two 2011 topics, housing and air quality, are not included in 2013 because there were no new data to report. There are 10 new topics. The new topics include: access to healthier food retailers, unemployment, nonfatal work-related injuries and illnesses, fatal work-related injuries, residential proximity to major highways, activity limitations due to chronic diseases, asthma attacks, health-related quality of life, periodontitis in adults, and tuberculosis. View the full report as a PDF.

REPORTS EXPOSE EXTREME PRESSURE GROUPS MASQUERADING AS THINK TANKS
Twelve new reports released today expose the State Policy Network (SPN), an $83 million web of right-wing "think tanks" in every state across the country. Although SPN's member organizations claim to be nonpartisan and independent, an in-depth investigation reveals that SPN and its state affiliates are major drivers of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)-backed corporate agenda in state houses nationwide, with deep ties to the Koch brothers and the national right-wing network of funders.   Read about the findings here.

E-CIGARETTES GAIN ATTENTION IN SCHOOLS AMID RISE IN POPULARITY
E-cigarettes are beginning to show up in the hallways of the nation’s middle schools and high schools. Just as health officials have begun to debate their potential dangers and school districts have started to pay attention to them, educators are grappling with how to deal with students who are found puffing on e-cigarettes while at school. Read the full article here.

E-CIGARETTES: THE VAPOR THIS TIME? A LIVE WEBCAST BY THE TOBACCO RELATED DISEASE RESEARCH CENTER
This is a live event and webcast on the scientific findings for electronic nicotine delivery devices, commonly called "e-cigarettes." Internationally renowned researchers will present the state of the science on e-cigarettes, a product with rapidly growing interest and global attention. A discussant will synthesize findings and Q & A will follow presentations.  Registration information and promotional flyer.

KIDS' EXPOSURE TO SECONDHAND SMOKE DROPS - EXCEPT AMONG THOSE WITH ASTHMA MILLION SMOKERS SHOULD GET YEARLY LUNG SCREENING, TASK FORCE SAYS
At a time when many Americans have managed to kick the habit, a surprising new government report finds that asthmatic kids are just as likely to be exposed to secondhand smoke as they were a decade ago, especially if they come from poor families. Read more about the study here.

NINE MILLION SMOKERS SHOULD GET YEARLY LUNG SCREENING, TASK FORCE SAYS
Heavy smokers who are at least 55 should have an annual CT scan to check for lung cancer, a government panel says. The recommendation, which could apply to about nine million Americans, would mean Medicare and many health insurance companies must start providing the test for free to patients.  Read more about the recommendations here.

FDA:MENTHOL CIGARETTES PROBABLY POSE GREATER THREAT THAN STANDARD ONES
The Food and Drug Administration said for the first time Tuesday that menthol-flavored cigarettes probably pose a greater risk to public health than standard cigarettes, largely reaffirming the findings of an agency advisory committee two years ago and potentially laying the groundwork for tighter regulations in the future. Read more about the findings here.

SEEKING OUT "EASY TARGETS"? TOBACCO COMPANIES, HEALTH INEQUALITIES, AND PUBLIC POLICY
The prominence of socioeconomic and ethnic disparities in tobacco use has led to increased policy attention on smoking inequalities in many countries.  Read more about the study here.

REGULATORY OPTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES
Read the fact sheet from the Tobacco Control Legal Consortium here.

CDC: SMOKE-FREE SUBSIDIZED HOUSING WOULD SAVE $521 MILLION A YEAR
The estimated annual cost savings from eliminating smoking in all U.S. subsidized housing would be $521 million, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This is the first study to estimate the costs that could be saved by prohibiting smoking in subsidized housing, including public housing and other rental assistance programs. The bulk of those annual savings – $341 million – would come from reduced health care expenditures related to secondhand smoke. The study also estimates savings of $108 million in annual renovation expenses and $72 million in annual smoking-related fire loses. Get the full press release here.

MARLBORO MAKER ALTRIA TO JUMP INTO E-CIGS
More information here.

BILL BANNING SMOKING IN CARS WITH KIDS HEADS TO SENATE FLOOR
The Virginia Senate Courts of Justice Committee voted 10-5 to send a bill, SB 975, banning smoking in vehicles when passengers include children under the age of 15. Infractions would be punishable by a fine up to $100. Read more about the bill here.  Read a letter supporting the bill written by Richard E. Merrit, Chair of the Alexandria Coalition on Clean and Smoke Free Air here.

VIRGINIA LAWMAKERS TAKE AIM AT CIGARETTE TRAFFICKING
Lawmakers are aiming to impose harsher penalties on cigarette traffickers in Virginia, where officials say low excise taxes have made it an attractive base for smugglers. Read the New York Times article here.

RECENTLY RELEASED: STATE OF TOBACCO CONTROL REPORT
The American Lung Association released its annual State of Tobacco Control Report on January 16, 2013. The report tracks progress on key tobacco control policies at the federal and state level, assigning grades based on whether laws are adequately protecting citizens from tobacco-caused disease. Click here to view the report.

CDC’S DID YOU KNOW?
“Did You Know?” is a weekly feature from the Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support to inform your prevention activities. We invite you to read, share, and take action! Each day, more than 1,200 people in the United States die from smoking and more than 2,500 youths and young adults become regular smokers.
Although smoking is decreasing among youth, seven percent of middle-school students and 23 percent of high school students used some form of tobacco last year.CDC offers helpful resources for preventing tobacco use among youth. Click here for a link to the CDC's "Did You Know's" relating to tobacco.

HHS ANNOUNCES BETOBACCOFREE.GOV
The Department of Health and Human Services is launching www.BeTobaccoFree.gov – the first comprehensive website that coordinates access to the best and most up-to-date tobacco-related information from across HHS into a single online location. The launch of this consumer website exemplifies our dedication to reduce the harms from tobacco use, which continues to be the number one cause of premature death and disease in the United States. BeTobaccoFree.gov was built using responsive design, which makes information accessible anywhere, anytime on any platform, from smart phone to tablet to desktop. Additionally, the website’s unique social media dashboard, “Say It - Share it,” constantly updates the latest tobacco social media, including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Infographics, Podcasts, and Tumblr.

OSH MEDIA NETWORK
Click here
for a variety of resource materials collected by OSH primarily related to media and communication.

MMWR: CURRENT CIGARETTE SMOKING AMONG ADULTS --- UNITED STATES
Among daily smokers, the proportion who smoked ≥30 cigarettes per day (CPD) declined significantly, from 12.6% in 2005 to 9.1% in 2011, whereas the proportion of those who smoked 1–9 CPD increased significantly, from 16.4% to 22.0%. To help reduce the national prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults to the HP2020 target of 12%, population-based prevention strategies (e.g., increasing prices of tobacco products, anti-tobacco media campaigns featuring graphic personal stories on the adverse health impact of smoking, smoke-free laws for workplaces and public places, and barrier-free access to help quitting) will need to be implemented more extensively.To learn more about the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports and search the database, click here.

MMWR: COMPREHENSIVE SMOKE-FREE LAWS – 50 LARGEST U.S. CITIES, 2000 AND 2012
Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure causes heart disease and lung cancer in nonsmoking adults and several health conditions in children. CDC and the American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation (ANRF) compared coverage by local or state CSF laws in the 50 largest U.S. cities as of December 31, 2000, and October 5, 2012. The analysis focused on smoking restrictions in the 50 largest cities because these cities represent an important indicator of nationwide trends in local and state policy and because they are home to an estimated 47 million persons, or nearly 15% of the U.S. population.For more information and to view the full report, click here.

Slaying the Jabberwock: The link between strong smokefree policies and drops in acute myocardial infarctions survives the funnel plot
Takagi et al. published an analysis of the effects of possible publication bias in Meyers et al.'s 2009 meta-analysis of 11 studies of the effects of smoke-free laws on hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction. Meyers et al. reported a 17% drop in AMI admissions (RR 0.83 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.92). Using a funnel plot Takagi et al. concluded that there was significant publication bias in Meyers et al.'s estimate and that correcting for this bias using the “trim and fill” method led to a conclusion that these laws were associated with a non-significant 3% (95% CI, 0.97 to 1.08) change in hospital admissions. Download PDF

Cardiovascular Effect of Bans on Smoking in Public Places: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Download PDF

Association Between Smoke-Free Legislation and Hospitalizations for Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Respiratory Diseases: A Meta-Analysis
Download PDF


New Publications

NEW PUBLICATIONS:


HOSPITAL DISCHARGE RATES BEFORE AND AFTER IMPLEMENTATION OF A CITY-WIDE SMOKING BAN IN A TEXAS CITY, 2004–2008.
The objective of this study was to examine hospital discharge data on 5 tobacco-related diagnoses before and after implementation of a smoking ban in a small Texas city. We compared hospital discharge rates for 2 years before and 2 years after implementation of the ban in the intervention city with discharge rates during the same time in a similar city with no ban.  Click here to read the study.

Influence of Tobacco Displays and Ads on Youth: A Virtual Store Experiment: this interesting study examines the potential impact of banning tobacco displays and ads at the point of sale (POS) on youth outcomes.  Click here to view the full text of the publication.

A Broken Promise to our Children: The 1998 State Tobacco Settlement 14 years later: This report from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids on state investments in tobacco control finds that states have only spent 1.8% ($459.5 million) of the $25.7 billion in funds obtained in the 2012 Fiscal Year from tobacco taxes and the Master Settlement Agreement on combating tobacco use. Click here to read a summary of the report’s findings in the New York Times. Click here to access the full report including an interactive map and state-by-state data.


Study: National and state estimates of secondhand smoke infiltration among U.S. multiunit housing residents - Nicotine & Tobacco Research – According to new data from CDC, over 79.2 million individuals reside in multiunit homes in the U.S., and 27.6-28.9 million that live in smoke-free multiunit homes are potentially exposed to secondhand smoke in their homes or around their buildings. Click here to read a summary of the findings in USA Today.


Report: LGBT Communities & Tobacco Use - The twelfth publication in Legacy’s dissemination series looks at the high prevalence of tobacco use and nicotine dependence in LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) communities. The release of the Legacy report was complimented by a video titled Tobacco Control in LGBT Communities, which looks at tobacco use among the LGBT population through personal stories and expert insights from Scout, PhD, Director of the Network for LGBT Health Equity and others.


Report: 2012 edition of America’s Health Rankings - United Health Foundation, American Public Health Association and Partnership for Prevention. An annual comprehensive assessment of the nation’s health on a state-by-state basis. The report ranks all states for their overall health and breaks down the results by rates of obesity, smoking, diabetes and sedentary lifestyle.


American Lung Association - State of Tobacco Control Report. Report assigns grades to state and federal government based on tobacco control policies. Key message: larger portions of funds received from state excise tobacco taxes and from settlements with tobacco companies were intended to be allotted toward smoking cessation and programs to improve the health of the public, and that states should increase funding for tobacco control program. National press release


American Journal of Public Health - A Comprehensive Examination of the Influence of State Tobacco Control Programs and Policies on Youth Smoking. Study assessed the impact of four policy interventions: tobacco control program expenditures, smoke-free air laws, youth access law compliance, and cigarette prices. Key message: If tobacco control policies and programs had remained at 2002 status/levels, youth smoking prevalence would have been 10% higher in 2008 than it actually was.

ADDICTION INCORPORATED: The true story of the tobacco companies' commitment to addicting the human brain.
Addiction Incorporated
is the true story of how the tobacco companies conspired to addict the human brain and deceive the American public, and how the world came to know about it.  It is a taut, journalistic exposé.  This documentary was a New York Times Film Critic pick, and for good reason. Directed by Charles Evans, Jr., this film took 15 years to complete. This highly informative and illuminating film has been successfully screened and well-received by audiences nationwide. Click here to view the trailer.

MMWR: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults
United States, 2011 – Key findings: The U.S. adult smoking prevalence did not decline significantly in 2011 vs. 2010. The first nationally representative data on smoking among people with self-reported disabilities revealed that individuals with disabilities have significantly higher smoking prevalence than the general population.

Preventing Chronic Disease: Smoking in Movies
A New Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Core Surveillance Indicator - Editorial from Dr. Tim McAfee and Michael Tynan, who respond to research findings that show a reverse in the recent decline of smoking depictions in movies. To assess national progress, CDC will now track youth exposure to tobacco use in movies as a core surveillance indicator.

GASO 2012 BUTTON
A new button promoting the GASO 2012 feature is available here.

OSH’S SMOKING & TOBACCO USE WEB SITE
Information on the OSH November Media Calendar page, found here, serves as a one-stop-shop that provides links to the CDC feature article as well as to quitting resources and social media tools.

LIKE, FOLLOW, AND SUBSCRIBE! SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT
To take advantage of all the activities we have planned on our social media profiles, you may wish to follow @CDCTobaccoFree on Twitter, like them on Facebook, or subscribe to the Smoking & Tobacco Use playlist on YouTube. Doing so will enable you to receive and share status updates and profile updates as they are posted. Within the CDC article, we will be featuring Wilma, a Tips campaign participant who successfully quit.

DIGITAL MEDIA: TIPS FROM FORMER SMOKERS WEB SITE
All
Tips Web pages are now social media optimized, so we encourage you to share your favorite pages on your social networks, including Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. In keeping with the quitting message that is a central theme of the CDC feature article, check out embedded videos on Beatrice and James’ personal pages within the Tips site.

OBAMA ADMINISTRATION GIVES SMOKERS A WAY OUT OF HIGHER INSURANCE PREMIUMS
This month, the Obama administration announced proposed rules related to how insurers will be expected to set insurance premiums under the Affordable Care Act. The federal law prohibits insurers from setting insurance rates based on characteristics such as health, gender, or occupation; however, the law does allow for differences in rates based on age, geography, and tobacco use.

While some tobacco control advocates find the differential smokers’ insurance premium to be a punitive measure, others praise the federal rule, expecting that it will encourage smokers to enroll in quit-tobacco programs. Click here to read about the Obama administration’s proposals on insurance premiums, or click here to read specifically about the tobacco-related provision.


Links to Data

Access the Behavioral Healthcare Provider Resouces database here. This resource was created as part of the strategic plan of CS2Day and we invite you to download this information.

CTP’s General Website—the hub from which to choose

Infographic on Progress To Date—Great pictorial rendition of above
Break The Chain Retailer Education Campaign—ex. sense of products we have out there—more to come for broader public health education campaigns

Link to Sign Up for Weekly Email Updates—great way to stay connected

Useful links re FDA tobacco regulatory program All these are public sites:


Telephone contact for FDA Center for Tobacco Products 1 877 287 1373
General inquiries:
AskCTP@fda.hhs.gov

Center for Tobacco Products, FDA
9200 Corporate Boulevard Rockville, Maryland 20850-3229

If you see what appear to be violations of the Federal Tobacco Control Act as inserted within the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act, you can make initial contact with:
FDA CTP Office of Compliance and Enforcement ctpcompliance@fda.hhs.gov or Phone 1 877 287 1373

Be prepared to send full details in writing or email to follow-up, if FDA seems interested. Unfortunately, law enforcement agencies such as FDA will usually be unable to keep you informed of what happens with your complaint, unless some public action eventually follows the complaint.

Overview of the Tobacco Control Act: BAD LINK: http://www.fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm24612 9.htm

You can search the retail compliance check database online by decision type (Civil Money Penalty, Warning Letter, or No Violations Observed) tobacco retailer name, city, state, zip code, and decision date. This site will enable you to click and read Warning Letters and Civil Money Penalty Complaints if they are sent out by FDA. Note: these warning letters and Civil Money Penalty Complaints are not posted immediately, but in batches, sometimes months after issuance.


Information for Healthcare Professionals

FDA Tobacco Regulation and Novel Tobacco Products, a presentation by Robert L. Baster, Co-Director, Center for the Study of Tobacco Products, Virginia Commonwealth University.  View the presentation here.

The Smoking Cessation Leadership Center (SCLC) is pleased to invite you to its nextfree webinar,“50th Anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health: Where Are We Now?”; on January 28, 2014 at 12:30pm Eastern Time (90 minutes). Register here.

SAVE THE DATE
PROMISING PRACTICES TO PROMOTE TOBACCO-FREE ACTIVE LIVING AND HEALTHY EATING IN LOW SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS COMMUNITIES
APRIL 28-29, 2014, WASHINGTON, DC

The Health Education Council and Break Free Alliance are pleased to announce our fourth national conference to promote change at policy, systems, and environmental levels to improve the health of low socioeconomic (SES) populations. This conference is unique in that it brings together the fields of tobacco control and obesity prevention, the goal being to facilitate a rich dialogue to provide cross-cutting strategies and lessons learned for people working in one or both fields.

The Call for Abstracts will open on May 15th, 2013 and will close on July 17th, 2013. Stay tuned for more information about the conference website, hotel, registration fees, scholarships and more!

AN INTRODUCTION TO E-CIGARETTES FOR STATES AND LOCALS, APRIL 29, 3:00PM (ET)
Everyone seems to be talking about e-cigarettes right now. Sales of the products are continuing to increase, with the potential to overtake traditional cigarette sales in the next decade. FDA has warned of the potential health risks of the products and announced its intent to regulate them. E-cigarette retailers and users claim to be pitted against Big Tobacco as policies to regulate the products are introduced in several states. To help you stay informed about this emerging issue, the National Association of Local Boards of Health (NALBOH) and the Tobacco Control Network (TCN) will present this webinar on e-cigarettes as the second of a two-part webinar series on "modified risk" tobacco products.  The first webinar on April 15th will focus on recent state harm reduction proposals, and provide tools and messages to counter the industry.  This second webinar will feature speakers from the Tobacco Control Legal Consortium, Legacy, Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, California Attorney General’s Office, and Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department, WA. For more information and instructions for accessing the webinar, visit www.ttac.org/tcn/materials. Questions? Contact tcn@sph.emory.edu.


SMOKESCREENS AND THE SILVER SCREEN: SMOKING IN THE MEDIA, MAY 13, 2:00PM (ET)
This webinar from the Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence at the American Academy of Pediatrics will focus on the influence of smoking imagery on children and evidence for smoking initiation.  Different types of media will be covered, as well as strategies to discuss the impact of smoking imagery with children, adolescents, and families in a pediatric clinical setting. Featured presenters include Jim Sargent, MD, FAAP of the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Jennifer Shu, MD, FAAP, of the Children's Medical Group in Atlanta. This webinar is approved for a maximum of 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Can't make the live webinar? No problem- the archived webinar will also be offered for a maximum of 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ through the AAP Richmond Center Web site. Contact richmondcenter@aap.org with any questions. Click here to register.

Tobacco Education For Oral Health Providers Webinar, April 9, 2:00pm
The National Association of Community Health Centers and Break Free Alliance are providing a free webinar to assist oral health providers tackle the challenges of addressing smoking cessation with their patients. The webinar will feature presenter Jill Loewen, RDA, BS, MS, CTTS, with the University of Detroit Mercy School of Dentistry, and was designed to help health provider define their role in addressing tobacco use; understand the impact of tobacco use on community health center patients; describe the steps involved for treating tobacco use; and identify additional resources for helping patients quit tobacco use. The session focuses on tobacco use and its impact on oral health, the types of tobacco products on the market, and how dental health personnel can implement a tobacco dependence treatment service in the dental practice. Click here to register.

AAP PROVISIONAL SECTION ON TOBACCO CONTROL NOW ACCEPTING ABSTRACTS FOR ANNUAL MEETING
On Sunday, October 27, 2013 in Orlando, Florida at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition (NCE), www.aapexperience.org, the AAP Provisional Section on Tobacco Control (PSOTCo) will be hosting a Section Program followed by an educational poster session.

The call for abstracts for the poster session is now available.  Click
here to access. Submissions by AAP members and nonmembers are welcome. Deadline for submissions is Friday, April 12, 2013.

The Section will be accepting submissions that address any aspect of tobacco and child health. Abstracts should describe ongoing or completed projects and/or present original research findings focusing on any aspect of tobacco control. Special consideration will be given to submissions by physicians in training at any level. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy
  • secondhand smoke exposure and child health
  • teenage initiation and smoking
  • media and smoking
  • emerging tobacco products
  • intervening with parental smokers during the pediatric office visit
  • tobacco dependency treatment
  • tobacco control policy

The event will take place from 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm on Sunday, October 27, with the poster session and reception starting at 5:00 pm. Abstract presenters that are selected are required to register for at least one day and will receive a discount on their NCE registration fees; however, all other meeting-related costs, including travel, must be paid for by the presenter.

If you are having trouble with the abstract submission system, please email Carolyn Mensching at
cmensching@aap.org.

For additional information about the PSOTCo and its current activities, please visit
www.aap.org/richmondcenter/PSOTCo/home.html, or e-mail the AAP Provisional Section on Tobacco Control at notobacco@aap.org. We welcome all AAP members in good standing to join our Section at no cost, including Resident Members! Once approved (anticipated July 2013), membership will be open beyond AAP members to include affiliate (non-AAP) members (ie, allied health, public health, international pediatricians, and research professionals). Email us at notobacco@aap.org if you want to be placed on our affiliate (non-AAP member) waitlist!

Access the Behavioral Healthcare Provider Resouces database here. This resource was created as part of the strategic plan of CS2Day and we invite you to download this information.

Ask and Act Practice Toolkit from the American Academy of Family Physicians: link
Collection of tobacco cessation resources designed to help health care providers work with patients who use tobacco. Toolkit includes information on Medicare benefits, guide to integrate cessation into electronic health records, plus printable posters and brochures.

FREE TAILORED CESSATION TOOLS FOR LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS
The Monday Campaigns in New York City, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University, is offering LHDs an opportunity to participate in a pilot to test a new strategy in tobacco cessation: using Monday as a weekly rally point to quit and recommit to quitting each week. Data supporting the campaign shows that people are more likely to take action to change health behaviors on Mondays than any other day of the week. Participating LHDs will receive free tailored materials to use in promoting their existing local cessation programs, including web and social media content and print materials.


FDA’S CENTER FOR TOBACCO PRODUCTS: NEW FORM FOR REPORTING POTENTIAL TOBACCO PRODUCT VIOLATIONS

The FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) is providing the public and other stakeholders with another option for reporting potential violations of Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act) and related regulations with its new Potential Tobacco Product Violations Reporting form. The form provides an opportunity for the public and other stakeholders to report a variety of potential violations. By making it easier for anyone to report potential violations of the Tobacco Control Act and related regulations, FDA is better able to monitor compliance with the laws, help reduce the health burden of tobacco use on the American public, and protect America’s youth. Download the Potential Tobacco Product Violations Reporting form at FDA's website.


Community Based Actions

Click here for an Example of Position Statement and here for the accompanying Introductory letter.

CDC feature article from 2012 featuring Million Hearts campaign.

Asian Smokers' Quitline Now Available Nationwide

The Asian Smokers’ Quitline, the first cessation service developed specifically for US smokers who speak Asian languages, is now available for  free nationwide telephone assistance for Cantonese-, Mandarin-, Korean- and Vietnamese-speaking callers who want to quit smoking. Callers can speak with a bilingual/bicultural counselor to receive help with quitting smoking, informational materials and referrals to other sources. Those who call will also receive a two-week starter kit of nicotine patches. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is funding the University of California, San Diego for only one year to operate the quitline. The National Network, Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL), hopes that the quitline will receive funding for further years, so that community members have continued access to culturally-tailored cessation resources. A high volume of calls to the quitline in this first year is extremely important to demonstrate that Asian Americans will use this resource. APPEAL would like to encourage all of our partners to promote the Asian Smokers’ Quitline in your respective communities. For more information about the Asian Smokers’ Quitline, please visit www.asiansmokersquitline.org.

SOPHE's guide to effectively educating state and local policymakers
The Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has released a resource guide that highlights the action steps that should be taken to educate policymakers on important health policy issues. It is based off of SOPHE’s State Health Policy Institute curriculum, which focused on educating state legislators and professionals on effective policies and the latest research in chronic disease prevention and control. Click here to read more, and to access the guide.

ClearWay Minnesota
ClearWay MinnesotaSM is pleased to share the release of our latest supplement for the American Journal of Preventive Medicine titled “Minnesota’s Investment in Applied Tobacco Control Research: Findings to Inform Practice and Policy.” Featured in this issue are eight original articles from ClearWay Minnesota-funded Research grantees and five research articles co-authored by ClearWay Minnesota staff on topics ranging from the impact of indoor-air policies, smoking and cessation among priority populations and tobacco product regulation. Also included is a review article by Drs. David Ashley and Cathy Backinger from the Food and Drug Administration and a commentary by Dr. Howard Koh, Assistant Secretary for Health.

One article that might be of particular interest to this distribution list is The Role of Public Policies in Reducing Smoking: The Minnesota SimSmoke Tobacco Policy Model. The model considered data on current, new and formers smokers in Minnesota from 1993 to 2011 to determine the effectiveness of tobacco control policies and programs on smoking rates. The results illustrate that a comprehensive approach to tobacco prevention, including tobacco taxes, smoke-free air laws, mass media campaigns, youth access laws and cessation treatment, have reduced smoking rates by 29 percent in Minnesota with tobacco taxes contributing the most to the decline. The model goes on to predict that if Minnesota increased the tax on tobacco products and continued aggressive mass media campaigns, the state could prevent 55,000 smoking-related deaths over the next thirty years. Dr. David Levy of Georgetown University pioneered the SimSmoke model over a decade ago has worked with various states and countries around the world. Dr. Raymond Boyle of ClearWay Minnesota conducted the SimSmoke research with Dr. Levy and Dr. Abrams. In addition to the article, be sure to check out the Fact Sheet and the News Release.

You can access copies of all the articles by visiting the ClearWay Minnesota website. As a learning organization, research is the foundation of ClearWay Minnesota’s programs and services. Since 2000, ClearWay Minnesota has awarded more than $19 million in grants to Minnesota researchers. The impact of our research funding has been felt well beyond Minnesota’s borders and has significantly contributed to the science base in the field of tobacco control. We are proud to highlight some of our grantees’ most recent work and findings from recent ClearWay Minnesota-funded research. We hope you find the information helpful as you continue to address tobacco-related issues. If you have any questions, please contact Megan Whittet, Senior Research Program Manager, at 952-767-1415 or mwhittet@clearwaymn.org.